Canada Thistle Canada Thistle Knapweed Knapweed Leafy Spurge Leafy Spurge Purple Loosestrift Purple Loosestrife Poison Hemlock Poison Hemlock St. Johnswort St. Johnswort Common Mullein Common Mullein

The concept of classical biological control is very simple. Exotic (non-native) weeds are responsible for the vast majority of the range weed problems in North America. When foreign weeds are introduced, they come without the successful co-evolved enemies that are present in their native ranges. Without these natural checks present, the weeds are able to out-compete native vegetation. Introducing biological control agents can restore the natural checks and balances that control exotic weeds in their native habitats.



 

This catalog features the widest selection of insects currently available. We are continuously working to include new products as they become available. If you want to know more about a weed or insect, including ones not featured in this catalog, please give us a call or Download IWC Catalog.

 


Stem gall fly
(Urophora cardui)

This fly lays eggs into stem tissue. The larvae then cause the formation of a hard woody gall that robs the plant of energy. Stems above the galls are often malformed, stunted and dry up before unattacked stems.

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Stem mining weevil
(Ceutorhynchus litura)

The larvae of this hardy weevil hatch on young leaf or stem tissue. They bore into the plant and mine towards the main stem. Older larvae mine the stem, crown, and root. The plant's root reserves are reduced by an average of 50% in attacked plants. Canadian research showed that the incidence of a fatal rust fungus disease was more than doubled when the insect is present.

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Pricing

We will work closely with you to make the release process as efficient as possible.  We will provide any consulting advice that you may require regarding the release, establishment, monitoring, and redistribution of these biocontrols as a service included with the purchase of the insects.

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Why Use Biological Control?

Exotic (non-native) weeds can be invasive. Introduced foreign weeds came without the successful co-evolved enemies present in their native ranges. Without these natural checks, the weeds are able to out-compete native vegetation. Introducing biological control agents can restore the natural checks and balances that control exotic weeds in their native habitats.

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Noxious Weeds

Canada Thistle

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Knapweeds

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Leafy Spurge

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Purple Loosestrife

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Toadflax

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Poison Hemlock

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St. Johnswort

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Common Mullein

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